21 Fruits to Grow Indoors

When it comes to edible houseplants, fruits are a triple threat as they offer vibrant colors, pleasant scents, and delicious flavor. While many people don’t add fruits to their gardens because they believe the task is too complex, today’s list will prove otherwise with 21 fruits to grow indoors.

Examples of fruits you can grow indoors include apricots, avocados, bananas, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, figs, goji berries, ground cherries, kumquat, lemons, limes, mulberries, nectarines, olives, oranges, passion fruit, peaches, raspberries, strawberries, and tomatoes.

Keep reading to learn more about the key characteristics and care requirements for each of these fascinating fruit plants.

1. Apricots

21 Fruits to Grow Indoors Apricots 1
  • Botanical name: Prunus armeniaca
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 8

Native to China, apricots come from fruiting trees. They bless gardens with orange-to-red fruits and white-to-pink flowers, creating an impressive feast for the eyes, nose, and mouth.

Apricot trees thrive in full sun where they require between 6 to 8 hours of light exposure. They prefer loamy, well-draining soil that’s neutral or slightly alkaline and rich in organic nutrients.

The ideal temperature range for apricot pants is from 65 to 85 degrees F. During winter, the best temperature range is between 32 and 45 degrees F.

Generally, apricot trees love dry weather with low humidity. Despite having perfectly edible fruits the seeds, leaves, and stems of the plant can be highly toxic to humans if ingested.

Growing apricots isn’t the ideal option for those new to gardening or who haven’t grown fruits indoors before. It’s not exactly difficult, it’s just not as easy as other fruits like raspberries and tomatoes.

If you’re set on growing apricots, some of the best varieties to grow in your indoor garden are Goldcot and Chinese apricots.

2. Avocados

  • Botanical name: Persea americana
  • Family: Lauraceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

The vast majority of avocados grown and eaten around the world are Hass avocados. This is because the plant comes back every year and produces fruits that change skin color when they’re ripe for harvesting.

Not to mention, Hass avocados have a long shelf life so you can store them for use throughout the year.

Avocado trees love sunlight and need about 8 hours of exposure daily. They thrive in loamy, well-drained soil of pH 5 to 7, ideally with a  temperature range from 60 to 85 degrees F.

At moderate difficulty, be careful if you have pets as all parts of the avocado plant can be very toxic to a wide range of animals.

Also, if you’re planting from seeds, avocado trees can take up to 13 years to reach a fruiting stage. As such, it’s better to propagate from a cut.

Read more: Best Vegetables to Grow Indoors Under Lights

3. Bananas

  • Botanical name: Musa spp.
  • Family: Musaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Herbaceous, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

Native to Africa, Asia, and Australia, banana plants are commonly referred to as trees, but they’re actually large herbaceous species. This means they possess fleshy stalks instead of woody stems.

Banana plants typically prefer warm climates (ideally 75 to 95 degrees F) with high humidity levels so you may need to mist often. They need at least 6 hours of full sun in slightly acidic, loamy, well-drained soil.

Also, banana plants require frequent water but don’t overdo it to avoid root rot. Lady Finger and Cavendish are among the best varieties to grow indoors.

4. Blackberries

  • Botanical name: Rubus Fruticosus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 8

Berries, in general, are very easy fruits to grow and care for. Besides being beginner-friendly, they don’t take less room than melon vines and fruit trees, so they’re great for indoor gardens.

Compared to other species of berries, blackberries are pretty high on the simplicity scale. All they need is adequate exposure to full sun and slightly acidic, well-drained rich soil with moderate watering.

Blackberries are pretty tolerant plants. Navajo and Triple Crown varieties are particularly popular among home gardeners.

5. Blueberries

  • Botanical name: Vaccinium
  • Family: Ericaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 3 to 10

Not many folks seem to remember this, but blueberries are fantastic fruits to grow indoors! They’re very easy and effective plants -especially in containers-, plus, their fruits are yummy and super good for your health.

They do require some patience though. Blueberry plants can take between 3 to 5 years to reach a fruiting stage. When they do, June and August is the best time for picking.

Blueberries thrive in highly acidic, sandy, and well-drained soil. They like plenty of water, but not so much that the soil turns soggy.

Provide your blueberry plant with 6 to 8 hours of full sun and keep them away from dry or cold winds.

6. Cherries

  1. Botanical name: Prunus avium
  2. Family: Rosaceae
  3. Plant type/Life cycle: Deciduous tree, perennial
  4. USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 7

Although they’re a common fruit tree to plant outdoors, cherries can also be a nice option to grow indoors with great results if you pay enough attention to their care requirements.

For one, cherry trees need a large enough container for effective indoor growth. You should also provide them with a minimum of 6 hours of full sun and loamy, rich, well-drained soil with regular watering to keep it moist but not wet.

Cherries also need temperate weather; not too hot or too cold. During winter, they require plenty of chill hours in temperatures below 45 degrees F to ensure flowering and fruiting the next season.

7. Figs

Figs on a tree
  • Botanical name: Ficus carica
  • Family: Moraceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Deciduous tree/shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 10

The exotic look of figs gives them the impression of being a lot more difficult to grow than reality. The truth is, these plants are very suitable for indoor gardens thanks to their carefree nature.

For the most part, figs are tolerant. They do well in full sun or partial shade and can thrive in a wide range of temperatures.

Fig plants can also handle various types of soils as long as they have good drainage. As for watering, do it regularly just to keep the soil moist.

Some of the best fig varieties to grow include Mission, Chicago Hardy, and Brown Turkey.

8. Goji Berries

  • Botanical name: Lycium chinense or Lycium barbarum
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 9

Also known as wolfberries, goji berries aren’t very common as indoor fruits despite being quite easy to grow and care for.

These orange-to-red fruits are native to Asia and have a solid reputation as a superfood thanks to their various medicinal benefits. You can eat goji berries on their own or add them to smoothies and other recipes.

This plant thrives in slightly alkaline, well-drained soil and needs plenty of time under full sun. It’s tolerant to drought, so you don’t need to water frequently once the roots are established.

9. Ground Cherries

  • Botanical name: Physalis pruinosa
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, annual
  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 8

You probably know cherries, but have you ever heard of ground cherries? These plants produce golden yellow-orange fruits that taste close to pineapple with hints of tomato.

Also known as strawberry tomato and husk tomato, ground cherries are one of the easiest indoor fruits to grow. They thrive in full, indirect sunlight and pretty much any type of rich soil.

You only need to keep them fairly moist and check for pests regularly.

If you’re set on growing ground cherries, some of the best varieties to grow in your indoor garden include Aunt Molly’s, Strawberry, and Cossack Pineapple.

10. Kumquat

Kumquat
  • Botanical name: Citrus japonica
  • Family: Rutaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

Kumquat is another uncommon option to add to your indoor fruit plant selection. This tree produces orange-colored beauties that look like oranges but are sized like olives.

The kumquat tree thrives in full sun, so be sure to provide your plant with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. The choice of soil should be slightly acidic, loamy, and well-drained with enough watering frequency to keep it moist but not soggy.

Spring is the best time to transplant or plant a kumquat tree to make sure there’s no threat of frost. Some of the most popular varieties include Nagami, Marumi, and Meiwa.

11. Lemons

  • Botanical name: Citrus limon
  • Family: Rutaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 8 to 11

Lemon plants aren’t only extremely easy to grow indoors, but they’re also a treat to all senses. With their bright yellow fruits, refreshing scent, and countless uses around the house, lemons are a safe bet for any home gardener.

Your lemon plant will thrive in full sun and warm weather, making sure to place it somewhere away from the wind. It needs very well-drained soil, preferably slightly acidic with moderate water once the roots are established.

Similar to kumquats, spring is the best time to transplant or plant a lemon shrub when there’s no threat of frost. Meyer, Lisbon, and Eureka are the most popular lemon tree varieties in the United States.

12. Limes

  • Botanical name: Citrus latifolia or citrus aurantiifolia
  • Family: Rutaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree/shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

Another type of citrus fruit that you can easily grow indoors is lime. These plants are mostly hybrids that do best in warm climates as they range from extremely to moderately cold-sensitive depending on the species.

The most common varieties of lime plants are known as Tahiti lime, Persian lime, West Indian limes, Mexican limes, or key limes.

Keep your lime plant in full sun in a spot protected from the wind. The soil has to offer good drainage with enough watering to stay moist but not soggy.

Related: What Houseplants Like to Be Misted?

13. Mulberries

  • Botanical name: Morus spp.
  • Family: Moraceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Deciduous tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 8

Contrary to what most people believe, mulberries make for a great addition to your indoor garden. Whether you prefer white or red mulberries, you can easily plant them in early spring but keep in mind that these trees are fast growers.

Native to China and North America, mulberries can thrive in both partial shade and full sun. They can deal with any type of soil that offers good drainage, but prefer temperatures below 80 degrees F.

These fruit trees are quite tolerant to drought once the roots are established. Not to mention, they do well without fertilization.

14. Nectarines

  • Botanical name: Persica nucipersica
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 9

Nectarines are close family members to peaches, except that they look more like apples.

They’re easy to moderate on the difficulty scale, and you can choose to grow them either from seeds or a cut from an established tree. The best time for planting, in either case, is spring or fall.

To ensure good results, keep your nectarines in a spot that gets plenty of indirect sunlight for about 6 hours. The tree does best in well-drained but you should make sure to add fertilizer every year.

If you’re considering nectarines, some of the popular varieties include Heavenly White and Snow Queen.

15. Olives

Olives
  • Botanical name: Olea europaea
  • Family: Oleaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Evergreen tree/shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 8 to 11

A classy addition to your indoor garden, olive trees are a sight to behold with their green leaves and slim branches. Their fruits possess a long list of benefits, not to mention, they taste delicious!

Growing an olive tree inside the house can be a fun project, however, it isn’t the ideal option for beginners. If you choose to plant olives, stick to popular varieties such as Beldi and Alfonso.

The plant needs plenty of sunlight, fresh air, and frequent watering. You also need to perform regular fertilizing and pruning to keep it in good shape.

16. Oranges

  • Botanical name: Citrus sinensis
  • Family: Rutaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

This may come as a surprise, but yes, you can grow oranges indoors. Dwarf sizes are particularly suitable for home gardens.

Of course, you need to provide the proper conditions for successful results. Orange plants thrive in full sun and should receive direct light for 8 hours per day.

They prefer loamy, well-drained soil and require consistent watering without turning the soil soggy. In addition to their famous fruits, orange trees also give beautiful white flowers.

17. Passion Fruit

  • Botanical name: Passiflora edulis
  • Family: Passifloraceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 9 to 11

Believe it or not, growing passion fruit in your indoor garden isn’t a “mission impossible” as many people seem to believe. It’s a vining plant though, so you have to provide it with a structure to climb on and grow.

Additionally, passion fruit plants need between 4 to 6 hours of exposure to full sun, preferably indirectly through a window. They prefer warmer temperatures between 65 and 85 degrees F.

18. Peaches

  • Botanical name: Prunus persica
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Tree, annual
  • USDA hardiness zones: 5 to 9

Peaches are a delicious fruit that most gardeners don’t even try to grow indoors although it can easily be done. Several dwarf varieties are ideal for containers and can fruit just like outdoor trees given the right conditions.

Indoor peach trees require around 8 hours of full sun and sandy, well-drained soil with moderate watering.

19. Raspberries

  • Botanical name: Rubus idaeus
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Shrub, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 8

Raspberries are very similar to blackberries when it comes to growth and care requirements. Particularly popular virtues include Tulameen and Polka.

These plants need around 8 hours of exposure to sunlight, preferably in a shaded area. They also like well-drained, slightly acidic soil and require regular watering to give you juicy fruits.

20. Strawberries

Strawberries
  • Botanical name: Fragaria × ananassa (hybrid)
  • Family: Rosaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: Herbaceous, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 4 to 9

Who doesn’t love strawberries? Native to North America, you can grow these lovely fruits indoors in hanging baskets, window containers, or hydroponic systems.

They’re generally easy to plant and maintain. Strawberries need about 8 hours of full sun, regular watering, and loamy, well-drained soil that’s slightly acidic.

21. Tomatoes

  • Botanical name: Solanum lycopersicum
  • Family: Solanaceae
  • Plant type/Life cycle: herbaceous, perennial
  • USDA hardiness zones: 2 to 10

Last but not least, you can grow tomatoes indoors! And yes, they’re fruits, berries to be specific.

This plant thrives in full sunlight and loamy, well-drained soil with regular watering once established

Wrap Up

There you have it, 21 fruits to grow indoors when you’re looking to add a pop of color to your home garden while also saving some money on fresh produce!