9 Purple Flowers That Look Like Bells

Looking to decorate your garden with gorgeous purple flowers that look like bells? Then this article is for you!

Species of bell-shaped flowers that come in purple include Bellflower, Traveler’s Joy, Heather Flower, Lily of the Valley, Checkered Lily, Azalea Flower, Virginia Bluebells, Foxglove, Balloon Flower, Four O’clock Flower, and Beardtongue Flower.

Keep reading to learn more about these stunning flowers as we discuss their key features and characteristics.

1. Bellflower

  • Family: Campanulaceae
  • Bloom Time: Summer, fall
  • Life Cycle: Annual, perennial, biennial
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9
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Campanula muralis natural background

First up, we have the Bellflower. Botanically known as Campanula, these plants are native to temperate and subtropical areas of the Mediterranean, Africa, and Western and Northern Asia.

The Campanula genus contains more than 300 species of flowering plants. In Latin, “campanula” means “tiny bell”. Both the botanical and common names of the flower are inspired by the bell shape of the plant’s blossoms.

When it comes to size, Campanula plants vary from dwarf to tall, reaching up to 6 feet in height. Their bell-shaped flowers come in a wide range of colors including purple, blue, mauve, lilac, pink, and white.

Bellflowers are easy to grow in various types of soil and conditions. Ideally, they prefer full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soil.

2. Clematis ‘Rooguchi’

  • Family: Ranunculaceae
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer, fall
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, climber
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8

Clematis, also known as Traveler’s Joy, Old Man’s Beard, and Queen of the climbers, is an extensive genus of more than 300 species of flowering plants. These plants produce blooms in multiple shapes ranging from flat flowers to dense clusters to today’s focus; bell-shaped flowers.

We’re specifically talking about Clematis ‘Rooguchi’, a hybrid variety that develops mesmerizing downturned flower bells in vibrant purple, indigo, and violet colors.

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’ flowers are easy to grow and don’t require much maintenance. They can reach a height of up to 8 feet and a width of up to 4 feet.

Clematis ‘Rooguchi’ flowers are great for attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. They’re also a great addition to small gardens, beds, borders, and patios.

This plant thrives when provided with full sun and partial shade. They prefer sandy or loamy, moist but well-drained soil.

Related: 10 Purple Flowers That Grow On Trees

3. Heather Flower

  • Family: Ericaceae
  • Bloom Time: Summer, fall
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, shrub
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 6

Calluna vulgaris, commonly known as Heather or Scottish Heather, is a genus containing only one species of the flowering plant. Its origin can be traced to North Africa, Europe, and even some regions of Asia

Heather plants produce spikes carrying bell-shaped blooms, each with 4 petals fused at the base. These purple and mauve flowers can effectively attract pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and other insects.

Care-wise, Heather flowers require both full sun and partial shade. They need regular watering and prefer sandy or rocky well-drained soil.

Heather flowers are often confused with Erica flowers, which are a different genus of the same family.

4. Lily of the Valley

  • Family: Asparagaceae
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, bulb
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 2 to 9
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Beautiful lilac flowers and lilies of the valley, on wooden background

Convallaria, also referred to as Lily of the Valley, is a genus consisting of 3 members only; Convallaria keiskei, Convallaria montana, and Convallaria majalis.

However, these species include many variants nowadays, producing flowers in various shades of purple, pink, and white. Despite its common name, this flower isn’t a true lily.

Convallaria blooms possess a perfectly bell-shaped outline with 6 fused petals. They’re small-sized plants, reaching a maximum height and spread of 1 foot.

What’s more, Convallaria flowers are extremely fragrant and are widely used in the perfume industry.

They’re also a symbol of purity, innocence, and happiness. Lily of the Valley was one of the flowers featured in Duchess Kate Middleton’s bridal bouquet at her royal wedding to Prince William.

Lily of the Valley is a hardy plant that has no problem thriving in any condition with some shade, but it does best in moist but well-drained soil. Handle this flower with caution as it’s toxic to people and pets.

5. Checkered Lily

  • Family: Liliaceae
  • Bloom Time: Spring
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, bulb
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 8

Scientifically known as Fritillaria meleagris, the Checkered Lily belongs to a genus containing more than 100 species of flowering plants. It’s indigenous to Europe and Asia.

Other common names of Checkered Lily include Snakes Head, Drooping Tulip, Crown Imperial, Widow’s Wail, Guinea Hen Flower, Lazarus Bell, Chess Flower, Leper Lily, and Weeping Widow.

This plant develops showy blossoms that display the classic bell shape of lilies. These pendant flowers possess checkered pigmentation patterns in shades of purple, magenta, red, red-brown, yellow, orange, and white.

Checkered Lilies are a symbol of rebirth and power. They look amazing as cut flowers as well as in borders, patios, garden beds, pots, rock gardens, and cottage gardens.

Additionally, this flower received the Award of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society.

The best part is that Checkered Lilies are easy to grow and maintain. They thrive in full sun and partial shade with moist but well-drained soil.

Reader Also Checked: 13 Potted Flowers That Attract Hummingbirds

6. Foxglove Flower

  • Family: Plantaginaceae
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, herbaceous
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Botanically known as Digitalis purpurea, Foxglove flowers are native to Northwest Africa and Europe. These are small to medium-sized plants that can reach up to 5 feet tall and 2 feet wide.

Other common names for Foxglove include Bloody Bells, Lady’s Glove, Dragon’s Mouth, and Fairy’s Cap.

Foxglove plants develop spikes of showy, bell-shaped flowers that face downward with 4 fused petals. They come in many lovely shades of purple, lavender, pink, yellow, white, and red.

Foxglove flowers are simple to grow but you should be careful when handling them as they’re highly poisonous to people and animals if consumed. They can attract bees and hummingbirds.

Full sun to partial shade and well-drained, slightly acidic soil are optimal conditions for this plant to thrive.

7. Balloon Flower

  • Family: Campanulaceae
  • Bloom Time: Summer, fall
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, herbaceous
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8
Purple balloon flower

Also known as the Chinese Bellflower and Japanese Bellflower, the Balloon flower is native to East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) and Russia.

Scientifically referred to as Platycodon grandiflorus, the Balloon flower is the sole member of its genus.

While the name “Platycodon” is derived from the Greek word “kodon” which translates into “bell”, the name “Balloon” flower comes from the balloon-like appearance of the bud before it blossoms into a bell-shaped bloom with 5 pointed petals.

This flower comes in purple, blue, blue-violet, white, and pink shades.

Balloon flowers are small-sized plants with a maximum height and spread of about 2 feet. They thrive in full sun to partial shade and require loamy, rich, well-drained soil with moderate watering.

8. Four O’clock Flower

  • Family: Nyctaginaceae
  • Bloom Time: Summer, fall
  • Life Cycle: Perennial, herbaceous
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 9 to 11

Four O’Clock flowers are known as Mirabilis jalapa or Mirabilis lindheimeri in the botanical scene. They’re also commonly called Marvel of Peru and Garden Jalap.

When it comes to ornamental use, these flowers are probably the most widely cultivated species of their genus.

The name “Four O’Clock” is a reference to the intriguing blooming pattern of the flower. Unlike flowers that close with the sunset, this bloom opens its petals in the late afternoon (around 4 p.m.) and shuts them with the sunrise.

Four O’Clock plants produce trumpet or bell-shaped blossoms with 5 fused petals. They come in various bright shades of purple, magenta, red, pink, yellow, and white.

Native to South America, Four O’Clock flowers grow best in full sun and moist, well-drained soil with regular watering.

This plant can reach up to 3 feet tall and wide, but keep in mind that all of its parts are poisonous to people and pets if ingested.

9. Beardtongue Flower

  • Family: Plantaginaceae
  • Bloom Time: Spring, summer
  • Life Cycle: Perennial
  • USDA Hardiness Zones: 3 to 8
Penstemon grandiflorus perennial pink purple flowers on stem, beautiful flowering plant

Last but not least, we’re checking out the Beardtongue flower. These beautiful blooms are indigenous to North America and belong to the Penstemon genus, which contains more than 250 species of these flowering plants.

Beardtongue flowers get this name from how they look. They possess a pollen-less stamen that sticks out of the petals, giving the flower a similar appearance to bearded irises.

Penstemons produce spikes of bell-shaped flowers. They come in a wide range of colors including purple, blue, red, pink, orange, yellow, and white.

Penstemons are easy to grow and care for as they can tolerate drought. They can reach a relatively large size of up to 8 feet tall and 2 feet wide.

This plant does best when provided with full sun and sandy or rocky, well-drained soil.

Wrap Up

There you have it, 9 purple flowers that look like bells.

Any of these beauties makes for a fantastic addition to your yard or garden if you’re looking to adorn the landscape in your property with a pop of unique color and shape.

Most of these flowers are quite easy to grow and maintain, so you shouldn’t have an issue keeping up with their needs.